Archive for the My Health Category

5 Secrets to Preserve Your Eyesight

Posted in My Health, My Study with tags , , , , on June 15, 2009 by rycopiero


More than ever we are using our eyes to stare at small type and images on computer screens, televisions, and cellphones—a modern trend that leads to eye fatigue and an increase in age-related eye problems. But diminished eyesight does not have to be an inevitable part of living long. Use these 5 secrets to promote and preserve the health of your eyes.

  1. A juice to brighten your eyesight
    An age-old Chinese folk remedy for clearing the vision is a blended juice made from celery, peppermint, and Chinese parsley. Research has caught up with this wisdom, and we now know that luteolin, an antioxidant bioflavonoid found in these three ingredients, has been found to provide the best protection of cell DNA from radiation. Some evidence shows that luteolin helps protect the eye from UV radiation damage, as well as from glycation, a process in which sticky sugar molecules bind up protein, potentially damaging the retina. Luteolin also promotes healthy blood sugar levels and regulates insulin sensitivity. Blend together celery, peppermint, and Chinese parsley in a blender with a little water or a juicer. Drink this fresh juice daily to see well into the future!
  2. Eat for eye health
    Let nature help you maintain vision health with its bounty of beneficial foods for eyesight. Spinach is full of lutein and zeaxanthin, antioxidants that protect your retina from the macular degeneration that comes with age. Don’t forget: fat increases lutein absorption, so remember to sauté your spinach in a little olive oil. (More leafy greens for a long life.) Other lutein and zeaxanthin vegetables include spinach, kale, turnip greens, collards, mustard greens, squash, green peas, broccoli, pumpkin, and corn. Chlorophyll-rich algae like spirulina, chlorella, and blue-green algae possess nutrients that are beneficial for the eyes. Carrots, loaded with vitamin A and beta-carotene, are also a great help to your eyes. Bilberry, a cousin of blueberry, boosts blood flow to eye nerves and is also rich in antioxidants. Goji berry is used to strengthen the eyesight, so snack on them in between meals.
  3. Stay hydrated
    Proper hydration is essential for good eye function. So drink filtered water regularly to stay hydrated. A slow and regular intake of water creates a constant supply of water to lubricate and nourish our eyes. Drink 8 glasses of water every day.
  4. Eye exercises to fight floaters
    These simple exercises improve and maintain good vision and may also get rid of those pesky floaters in your eyes.

    • Rub your palms together to create heat, and then place them against your eyes for five seconds. Repeat this three times.
    • Roll your eyes in circles, starting at the top and slowly circling 10 times clockwise and 10 times counterclockwise.
    • Hold a pen at arm’s length, focus your eyes on it, and slowly bring the pen closer until it’s about six inches away from your nose. Then slowly move it back, keeping your eyes focused on the pen, 10 times in all.
    • Using your thumb knuckles, massage your temples in small circles, 20 times in one direction and 20 in the other. Repeat the same actions above the mid-point of the eyebrows at the forehead, then below the eyes on both sides of the bridge of the nose.
    • Take a nap on the job! Put your head back, close your eyes, and relax for three minutes.

    After a month you will notice an improvement in vision and a decrease in floaters. Try to do these exercises first thing in the morning, just before bed, or whenever your eyes feel tired, like after computer use. Make sure your hands are clean and that you are relaxed. The key to progress is daily practice, so make it a habit! Additionally, take care of your eyes by wearing UV-protective sunglasses.

  5. Instant eye remedies
    Try these dietary and herbal remedies for overall eye health:

    • To nourish your eyes, follow Popeye’s lead. Boil 4 ounces of fresh spinach in 4 cups of water. Drink this spinach tea daily to give vital nourishment to your eyes.
    • Grape seed extract (OPC) and bilberry extracts contain potent antioxidants for eye health.
    • Taking ginkgo on a daily basis has been shown to improve circulation to the eyes. Find it in a health food store.
    • When your eyes feel tired, lie down and place slices of cucumber on your eyelids to soothe the eyes and restore moisture.
    • As a general rule of thumb, eye exams should be done once every 2 to 4 years for everyone under age 40 and once every 2 years after. This way, you can detect issues before they become severe.

You can find these eye health secrets and many others in my newest book Second Spring.

I hope these help you maintain good vision well into your golden years! I invite you to visit often and share your own personal health and longevity tips with me.

May you live long, live strong, and live happy!

–Dr. Mao

Source : http://health.yahoo.com/experts/drmao/18910/5-secrets-to-preserve-your-eyesight/

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Why do feet stink?

Posted in My Health, My Study with tags , , , , , on April 4, 2009 by rycopiero
baby-feet

Each of these little feet have a quarter of a million sweat glands in them. See these personal hygiene pictures for ways to keep all your parts looking and smelling fresh.

E­verybody is familiar with this phenomenon. Most of us have a friend or relative who can clear out a room when they kick off their shoes. And even the sweetest smelling person can do a decent job stinking up a pair of shoes by running a few miles in them. So what’s going on here? Why do your feet have a stronger odor than the rest of you does?

­The main thing that feeds foot smell is sweat. With more than 250,000 sweat glands each, your feet are among the most perspiring parts of the body. In one day, each foot can produce more than a pint of sweat! Sweat is basically just salt and water, though, so it doesn’t have a distinctive smell of its own. The smell is actually caused by bacteria on our skin that eats the sweat and excretes waste that has a strong odor. It’s perfectly normal to have bacteria on your skin, and it doesn’t ordinarily produce a noticeable smell, but sweat attracts bacteria and gives them a whole lot to feed on.

Of course we sweat all over — our hands have a comparable number of sweat glands, for example — and most of the rest of our body doesn’t particularly stink (the armpits being a notable exception. See How Sweat W­orks for details.) So what’s different about our feet? The answer is our socks and shoes. The sweat our feet excrete can’t easily escape into the air like the sweat our hands excretes — it all collects on our skin and in our socks. The bacteria love this dark, damp feast and have a sort of feeding frenzy. When you take off your shoes, the smell that hits you is all the bacteria excretion that’s collected on your feet and in your socks and shoes.

The main reason some people’s feet (or more precisely, some people’s socks and shoes) smell worse than other people’s is that some people sweat more than other people. This is just one of the many variable physiological qualities of human beings. This is also why sometimes your feet smell much worse than at other times — it all has to do with how much you sweat.

Tips to Reduce Foot Odor

So, since foot odor is caused by bacteria digesting sweat, there are two main ways to reduce the stink. You can:

  • decrease the amount of bacteria on your feet
  • decrease the amount of sweat that collects on your feet and in your shoes

Reducing the level of bacteria is really a matter of cleanliness. To control the bacteria population on you feet, you should:

  • wash your feet with strong anti-bacterial soap
  • wear clean socks
  • don’t wear the same shoes everyday – give a pair of shoes 24 hours or more to air out before wearing them again

To reduce the amount of sweat that collects in your shoes, you should:

  • wear well-ventilated shoes instead of very constrictive shoes, such as boots
  • always wear socks, preferably made of cotton or other absorbent materials that absorb a lot of the sweat so the bacteria can’t feed on it
  • change your socks a few times a day
  • buy some absorbent Odor-Eater type shoe inserts
  • apply an antiperspirant to your feet

­If your foot odor is really bad and these solutions don’t help much, then you should see a doctor. There are a number of prescription drugs that can treat serious foot odor, some by killing bacteria and some by reducing foot sweat.

source :
http://health.howstuffworks.com/question514.htm